Soldier With A Backpack: Living and Dying Simultaneously by Linda Diane Wattley

Soldier With A Backpack: Living and Dying Simultaneously Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, the hidden love killer, is instrumental in creating a world of alienation in the human experience.

Soldier with a Backpack, Living and Dying Simultaneously is written to form a silent unity of hope and understanding for individuals experiencing or knowing someone with PTSD and to reveal a needed truth about it.

Linda D. Wattley grew up with a tainted trust in adults, now that she has become one herself; Author Wattley began to learn why adults were so unhappy. She realized that stress and trauma had molded her into someone who felt unworthy of love, yet there was still something else willing her to life, telling her to share with the world that sufferers of PTSD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder are more than words could ever describe.

Author Wattley shares the experienced impact stress and trauma has on the human soul and the price we pay ignoring this reality. It is with great urgency she intimately shares her plight in life with her readers. Being mentally, emotionally, spiritually and physically raped as a child, she survived by learning to exist in an inner world of divine peace.

Something happened to that little girl; she didn’t die nor did she live, yet much was lost while much was gained.

Cold Coffee Book Review: Author Linda Diane Wattley’s memoir ‘Soldier With A Backpack: Living and Dying Simultaneously’ is packed with nuggets of pure truth meant to expose the evil that was meant to destroy her, show God’s greatness and attest to her healing from PTSD. Once I started reading, I couldn’t put her story down. I especially love memoirs, because it takes a special kind of strength to write a memory and share raw emotion and experience with the world.

If you enjoy reading memoirs that are a journey from hell into healing with ordained, anointed prayer behind the words to encourage others along their journey, this book is a must read.

Linda says, “Out of trauma, much drama occurs. Trauma has so many levels of appearing in our lives from the war zones where our soldiers witness death and the survival of death, vehicular accidents, murders, catastrophic disasters, illnesses, rape, sudden deaths of our loved ones; the list is unending.”

“Cycles can be broken when light is shined on reality. This is my purpose to shine light on the personal aftermath of trauma. ‘And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.’ John 8:13.”

Follow Linda through her life, learn from her healing and willingness to share what most people would hide in the darkness. Enjoy the short, direct poems scattered throughout the book and learn how Linda activated the love of God in her life, so she can be a beacon of light (“messenger”) to those seeking healing form PTSD.

I (Theodocia McLean) endorses Soldier With A Backpack: Living and Dying Simultaneously (After The Storm Publishing Presents) by Linda Diane Wattley as her memoir from darkness into light. I purchased and reviewed this book from Kindle format. The review was completed on January 30, 2016.

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(click to listen in)

Let’s talk about PTSD

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Professional Website Links
http://www.lindadianewattley.com/
http://collectivefaith.com/universalove1957/
https://www.gofundme.com/ptsdfreedom
http://blackauthors.ning.com/profile/LindaDWattley
http://www.faithwriters.com/websites/my_website.php?id=19419
https://www.instagram.com/lindawattley
http://www.thecheers.org/contributors/author-profile-339.html

Professional Blog Links
http://www.lindadianewattley.com/blog/
http://anndandridgepublicrelations.ning.com/profile/LindaDWattley?xg_source=activity
https://sites.google.com/site/lindadianewattley1/blog
http://lindadianewattley.blogspot.com/

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Signs of (a) Life by Liam Samolis

OK, women, here it is!

Finally, a gut honest personal journal written by a man that hits the pages of Signs of (a) Life with both serious and laugh-out-loud stories.

To begin with, Liam speaks of issues that we can all relate to as we stand in front of a mirror and are surprised to see the older, graying image of someone we barely recognize staring back.

Liam states this right off the bat, “Warning: this book contains within it accounts of real conversations which may therefore occasionally include naughty words and rude phrases. I’ve even made up some words of my own. That’s the real world for you.”

Within the 502 pages and 61 topics this author presents his half century of life experiences in a relaxed, well thought out format that lets the readers empathize with him. His stories involve experiences not just a man, but as a boy. Very few men will bare their souls to share experiences of awkwardness while moving from childhood into manhood. Liam shares some of his experiences while attending a single-sex school for boys. He shares his discovery of girls, cars and various medical issues.

Some of the most interesting stories involve his experiences as a police officer in England. The most touching are his stories about the birth of his children. Liam dedicates this book to his children.

I invite you to come laugh and cry with Liam Samolis as we wait to see what happens in his next fifty years of living.

I leave you with this quote from Liam. “Like the vast majority of men; I feel. I enjoy (which, by the way, seems to be an ‘allowed’ emotion), I grieve, I feel sad, I feel hurt. I screw up. At times I am emotionally vulnerable. And there is nothing – to my mind – remotely un-masculine about any of that; feeling is part of living – an integral part. In fact for me, feeling is THE essential part of living. Feeling can never be wrong in principle (because it simply happens without conscious intention) – and neither can displaying or being honest about our emotions. Being overtaken by emotions in a situation where action is necessary could, of course, be problematic, but feeling and showing our feelings is essential in the long term for our personal health. I wonder how much happier many men could be if their emotions were not effectively under lock and key? Hey – that almost rhymes.”

Theodocia McLean endorses Signs of (a) Life by Liam Samolis as the honest account of a man living his life with all the human emotions that men typically try to avoid speaking about. This review was completed on October 18, 2015.

Genre: Biographies & Memoirs, Memoirs, Nonfiction

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Within Her Grasp by Joanne Simon Tailele

Mari-Rae Sopper knew what she wanted to be since she was ten-years-old, when she watched Nadia Comãneci score that “perfect ten” at the Montreal Olympics. She wanted to be a professional gymnast. So she made a plan.

Driven by excellence and determination, “Mari-Rae put Fremd on the map,” according to Larry Petrillo, her high school coach. She moved on to be a formidable opponent in college gymnasts at Iowa State University and an impressive defense attorney for the Navy JAG core.

Within Her Grasp chronicles Mari-Rae’s journey to reach her dream while battling emotional issues that soared her to the skies and plunged her into the depths of despair, drove her to veer from her plan, but never from her dream.

“A beautiful thing about Mari-Rae was that she did more than get upset when she saw injustice – she acted on many of her convictions. She had an undying belief in doing the right thing, regardless of mainstream thinking.” Jennifer Eichenmueller

“Mari-Rae was known for a dramatic flair. Her letters were no postcards – five pages front and back, hand-written and smeared because she was a lefty. They were her manifestos, read and re-read with notes in the margins, until they were perfect, because she wanted you to know exactly where she stood. And that’s what we could count on, her honest opinion.” Dave Eck

“She lived her life basically like she wasn’t going to be here tomorrow. If she believed in something, she went all the way, and I think if more people did that, they’d be happier.” Mari-Rae’s mother, Marion Kminek

Genre: Biography

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